Brittany M Chapman, MD

Start Year
2019

Basics

Hometown
Rochester Hills, MI

Where did you attend college/university?
University of Michigan

Where did you attend medical school?
Duke University School of Medicine

What are your career goals?
I plan to apply for fellowship at the end of residency, most likely in cardiology. I enjoy having longitudinal patient relationships, and look forward to forming long-term relationships with my patients in my future career. I also enjoy medical education and hope to incorporate teaching into my career as well. I see myself practicing in conjunction with an academic medical center, and potentially pursuing qualitative research opportunities centered on patient preferences and/or patient outcomes, or quality improvement projects.

What did you do the summer before intern year?
I spent the summer before intern year visiting my family in Michigan, spending time with my husband and two dogs, and working on home improvement projects. I also took advantage of the downtime before residency by going hiking, baking, and gardening.

 "The residents truly do serve as the primary providers for their patients, but the attending is always available for questions and to help with difficult situations. Residents are really well supported but not stifled from growth, which I think is a difficult balance that Duke strikes incredibly well."

-Brittany Chapman

Reflections on the Duke Program

What were you looking for in a residency program?
I was looking for a residency program that not only has a strong training program, but also value the wellness of its residents. It was important to me to go to a program where it felt as though all of the residents were supported by not only each other but also by the program leadership, balanced with an exemplary training program leaving them prepared for their future career.

What are the strengths of the Duke Program?
Duke does a great job of balancing strength of training with the wellness of its residents. While there are high stress rotations and some of our cases can be quite complicated, Duke really ensures that there are opportunities for self-care and mechanisms in place to make the residents feel supported. The faculty are all incredibly supportive and smart, and take their teaching responsibilities seriously while also allowing the residents to take ownership of patient care.

What are your observations about the relationships between faculty and house staff?
The faculty do a really good job of balancing resident autonomy with time spent teaching and educating.The residents truly do serve as the primary providers for their patients, but the attending is always available for questions and to help with difficult situations. Residents are really well supported but not stifled from growth, which I think is a difficult balance that Duke strikes incredibly well.

Tell us about your co-interns. What has helped you connect, support each other, and form friendships?
My co-interns are absolutely fantastic. Even though we’ve only known each other for a month and a half, it feels as though we have known each other much longer. The program does an amazing job of putting together a talented and diverse group of people that really work well together and enjoy spending time together both in and out of the hospital. We have a GroupMe for the intern class that is always active with people doing things around Durham, which is always fun!

What has surprised you most about Duke?
I did medical school at Duke as well, so I already knew a decent amount about the program. I think the part that surprised me most was ease of transition from medical student to resident. I was happily surprised by how well supported and empowered I felt to take on ownership of my new role as resident.

About Duke University and Durham

What is the best thing about living in Durham and the Triangle?
Durham is an amazing place to live. My husband and I have been here for about five years, and I feel as though we’re always finding something new to do or somewhere new to go out to eat. Durham is constantly evolving which makes it really exciting to live here, and being so close to Raleigh and Chapel Hill always allows for diversity of things to do. You’ll never be bored in the Triangle!

How does the Triangle appeal to people of diverse backgrounds?
With all the collegiate activity and technology that’s based in the Triangle, it attracts a truly diverse group of people to the area that you don’t typically find in this region. This coupled with the proximity to the Carolina mountains and the sea make it a truly unique area.

Where did you choose to live and why?
My husband and I own a home off of Highway 70 and Miami near Brier Creek, so it was an easy decision to choose to continue to live here!

What advice would you give to someone looking to move to Durham?
Durham is a really great place to live. It has all the charm of the South, while also having the diversity and progressive aspects of a larger city. The craft brewery and food scene here rival any major city, and there is always a ton to do. My best advice would be to try as many of the amazing restaurants and breweries that you can!

What are your interests outside of medicine? 
I enjoy spending time with my husband and two dogs, hiking, and baking. I especially love decorating sugar cookies.