Zak Loring, MD, MHS

Advanced Training Program
Start Year
2020

Education and Training

Medical School
Duke University

Residency
University of California, San Francisco

Cardiovascular Disease Fellowship
Duke University

Advanced Training in Cardiology Fellowship
Duke University

Fellow Perspective

Tell us briefly about your background before fellowship.
I am originally from Alameda, CA in the SF Bay area and did my undergraduate at UCLA. I came to Duke for medical school in 2008 and took 2 dedicated research years (one at Duke, one in Washington, D.C. working at the FDA). I went back to the Bay area to do my residency at UCSF. My wife (also a California native) and I missed our time in Durham and were very excited to come back to Duke for fellowship.

What are your career plans in cardiology?
I am interested in academic electrophysiology and am planning to have active clinical and research roles. My research focuses on developing patient-tailored approaches to electrophysiology therapies such as device implantation and ablation by integrating electrocardiogram information with other clinical data to better phenotype patients and match them to appropriate treatments.

Why did you choose Duke for your fellowship training?
Having done my medical school here, I had first-hand knowledge of the breadth of research opportunities available as well as the flexibility of the program to be able to develop a specialized set of skills. The Duke Clinical Research Institute set Duke apart from all of the other programs I considered in the variety of clinical research available, outstanding mentorship, and a strong track record of producing academic physicians. In addition to the research opportunities, Duke provides a rigorous clinical training environment where fellows are integral to the clinical mission. Duke is a high-volume, high-acuity center that gets some of the most complicated cases in the Southeast region, and its fellows are involved in every part of patient care. Lastly, because my training path is so long (I will be PGY-9 when I’m done), my wife and I wanted a place where we could live comfortably and start a family. Durham is a great place to live with plenty of great restaurants, bars and outdoor activities while being affordable on a fellow’s salary.

What advice might you offer residents looking at fellowship programs?
Be honest with yourself about what is most important to you in a program. It is important to find a place that will feel like “home” to you, but don’t be afraid to go out of your comfort zone, if you find a place that will help you get where you want to be, rather than where you are. It's important to find mentors and role models and look at the track record those people have in helping fellows be successful. Do what is right for you and your family. Fellowship can be long and be sure to discuss how this decision impacts the lives and goals of your whole family.

From your experience in fellowship, what have you learned about training at Duke?
Fellows who train at Duke all have a strong foundation of clinical skills, but everyone also has something that sets them apart. There are core skills and competencies that all fellows leave with which will make them great clinicians, but what is unique about Duke is the flexibility the training program provides. Our fellows use their time in the 3rd and 4th years of the program to develop in the areas of interest to them and use that time to distinguish themselves. The opportunities made available to fellows as well as the support to blaze new trails allow our fellows to become leaders in many different aspects of medicine.

How is your life in the Triangle area outside of work?
I love living in Durham. My wife and I live in the Woodcroft area in South Durham. It’s a very family-friendly area and has a large network of mixed use trails for running, biking and letting our 2-year-old explore. We also love all the great restaurants and bars in downtown Durham. The Durham Performance Arts Center also hosts a lot of big name acts and shows, and we have seen great live music, comedy and traveling shows. We also like visiting Asheville to go to the great breweries and go hiking or take a day trip out to the beach.

Publications

Loring, Zak, Peter Shrader, Larry A. Allen, Rosalia Blanco, Paul S. Chan, Michael D. Ezekowitz, Gregg C. Fonarow, et al. “Guideline-directed therapies for comorbidities and clinical outcomes among individuals with atrial fibrillation.” Am Heart J 219 (January 2020): 21–30. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2019.10.008.

PMID
31710841
Full Text

Loring, Zak, and Albert Y. Sun. “Should His Bundle Pacing Be Preferred over Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Following Atrioventricular Junction Ablation?” Cardiol Clin 37, no. 2 (May 2019): 231–40. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ccl.2019.01.006.

PMID
30926024
Full Text

Pahlm, Olle, Cees A. Swenne, Sumche Man, Yama Fakhri, Brett D. Atwater, Ljuba Bacharova, Lia Bang, et al. “Dr. Galen Wagner (1939-2016) as an Academic Writer: An Overview of his Peer-reviewed Scientific Publications.” Journal of Electrocardiology 50, no. 1 (January 2017): 47–73. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2016.11.008.

PMID
28010929
Full Text

Loring, Zak, Jenny K. Cohen, Juliet Morgan, Joseph Yang, and Jeffrey Zimmet. “The late presenting STEMI: How ECG scores can be used to estimate event time.” Journal of Electrocardiology 49, no. 5 (September 2016): 740–43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2016.06.013.

PMID
27426204
Full Text

Wieslander, Björn, Zak Loring, Wojciech Zareba, Scott McNitt, Galen S. Wagner, James P. Daubert, and David G. Strauss. “Scar burden assessed by Selvester QRS score predicts prognosis, not CRT clinical benefit in preventing heart failure event and death: A MADIT-CRT sub-study.” J Electrocardiol 49, no. 4 (July 2016): 603–9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2016.04.008.

PMID
27212144
Full Text

Loring, Zak, Peter Hanna, and Cara N. Pellegrini. “Longer Ambulatory ECG Monitoring Increases Identification of Clinically Significant Ectopy.” Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology : Pace 39, no. 6 (June 2016): 592–97. https://doi.org/10.1111/pace.12852.

PMID
27005323
Full Text

Manesh, R. S., S. E. Rogers, Z. Loring, E. Stewart, G. Dhaliwal, and L. Tierney. “A Physician with Thigh Pain.” Federal Practitioner 33, no. 6 (June 2016): 42–44.

PMID
30766183
Scholars@Duke

Johannesen, L., J. Vicente, R. A. Gray, L. Galeotti, Z. Loring, C. E. Garnett, J. Florian, M. Ugander, N. Stockbridge, and D. G. Strauss. “Improving the assessment of heart toxicity for all new drugs through translational regulatory science.” Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics 95, no. 5 (May 2014): 501–8. https://doi.org/10.1038/clpt.2013.238.

PMID
24336137
Full Text

Chan, Dulciana D., Katherine C. Wu, Zak Loring, Loriano Galeotti, Gary Gerstenblith, Gordon Tomaselli, Robert G. Weiss, Galen S. Wagner, and David G. Strauss. “Comparison of the relation between left ventricular anatomy and QRS duration in patients with cardiomyopathy with versus without left bundle branch block.” The American Journal of Cardiology 113, no. 10 (May 2014): 1717–22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2014.02.026.

PMID
24698465
Full Text

Galeotti, Loriano, Peter M. van Dam, Zak Loring, Dulciana Chan, and David G. Strauss. “Evaluating strict and conventional left bundle branch block criteria using electrocardiographic simulations.” Europace : European Pacing, Arrhythmias, and Cardiac Electrophysiology : Journal of the Working Groups on Cardiac Pacing, Arrhythmias, and Cardiac Cellular Electrophysiology of the European Society of Cardiology 15, no. 12 (December 2013): 1816–21. https://doi.org/10.1093/europace/eut132.

PMID
23703366
Full Text

Pages