Asheley Cockrell Skinner, PhD

Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor in Medicine
Member of the Duke Clinical Research Institute
Campus mail 2400 Pratt Street, Durham, NC 27705
Phone (919) 668-6360
Email address asheley.skinner@duke.edu

Areas of expertise: Health Services Research, Implementation Science, Health Policy and Epidemiology

Asheley Cockrell Skinner, PhD, is a health services researcher whose work addresses a variety of population health issues, particularly implementation of programs to improve the health of vulnerable populations. She is currently an Associate Professor at Duke University in Population Health Sciences. She received her PhD in 2007 in Health Policy and Administration at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  A nationally-known expert in childhood obesity, her work uses a data-driven approach to understand pediatric obesity and improve implementation of evidence-based treatment. She applies this implementation science approach to other populations, including children involved in child welfare investigations and individuals affected by opioid use or misuse. In addition to her many roles in research, she also currently serves as the Director of Graduate Studies for Population Health Sciences, directs multiple training programs, and actively mentors undergraduate and graduate students, fellows, and junior faculty.

Education and Training

  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Program on Health Care Quality and Patient Outcomes, School Of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007 - 2009
  • Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007

Publications

Hobbs, Suzanne Havala, Edward F. Brooks, Virginia Wang, and Asheley Cockrell Skinner. “Developing practitioner leaders in a distance education doctoral program: challenges and opportunities..” J Health Adm Educ 24, no. 3 (2007): 283–300.

PMID
18476504
Scholars@Duke

Skinner, Asheley Cockrell, Rebecca T. Slifkin, and Michelle L. Mayer. “The effect of rural residence on dental unmet need for children with special health care needs..” J Rural Health 22, no. 1 (2006): 36–42. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-0361.2006.00008.x.

PMID
16441334
Full Text

Mayer, Michelle L., Rebecca T. Slifkin, and Asheley Cockrell Skinner. “The effects of rural residence and other social vulnerabilities on subjective measures of unmet need..” Med Care Res Rev 62, no. 5 (October 2005): 617–28. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077558705279315.

PMID
16177461
Full Text

Mayer, Michelle L., and Asheley Cockrell Skinner. “Too many, too few, too concentrated? A review of the pediatric subspecialty workforce literature..” Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 158, no. 12 (December 2004): 1158–65. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpedi.158.12.1158.

PMID
15583101
Full Text

Dusing, Stacey C., Asheley Cockrell Skinner, and Michelle L. Mayer. “Unmet need for therapy services, assistive devices, and related services: data from the national survey of children with special health care needs..” Ambul Pediatr 4, no. 5 (September 2004): 448–54. https://doi.org/10.1367/A03-202R1.1.

PMID
15369415
Full Text

Mayer, M. L., R. T. Slifkin, and A. C. Skinner. “Addressing disparity in treatment received - Reply.” Pediatrics 114, no. 2 (August 1, 2004).

Scholars@Duke

Mayer, Michelle L., Asheley Cockrell Skinner, Rebecca T. Slifkin, and Rebecca T. National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs. “Unmet need for routine and specialty care: data from the National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs..” Pediatrics 113, no. 2 (February 2004): e109–15. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.113.2.e109.

PMID
14754979
Full Text

Williams, Eric S., and Asheley Cockrell Skinner. “Outcomes of physician job satisfaction: a narrative review, implications, and directions for future research..” Health Care Manage Rev 28, no. 2 (April 2003): 119–39. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004010-200304000-00004.

PMID
12744449
Full Text

Pages