Susanna Naggie, MD

Professor of Medicine
Vice Dean for Clinical Research
Member in the Duke Clinical Research Institute
Campus mail 300 West Morgan St, Suite 800, Durham, NC 27701
Phone (919) 684-2584
Email address susanna.naggie@duke.edu

Dr. Susanna Naggie completed her medical education at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and her internal medicine training at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC), where she also served as a Chief Resident in Internal Medicine.  She completed her Infectious Diseases (ID) fellowship training at Duke and then joined the faculty in the Division of ID. She is an Associate Professor of Medicine with Tenure and currently holds joint appointments at the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI, Director of ID Research), and at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Dr. Naggie has dedicated her academic career to the care of patients with HIV and viral hepatitis, with a research program focused on understanding the mechanisms of accelerated liver fibrogenesis in this population and the extrahepatic health outcomes attributed to HCV in persons with HIV infection. In addition to her investigator-initiated research program, Dr. Naggie is also involved in multiple clinical trials and clinical registries with a particular focus on HIV and liver disease. She is the prior co-Chair of the AASLD/IDSA HCV Guidance Committee and is currently Chair of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Viral Hepatitis Transformative Science Group Committee and a member of the DHHS Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Adults and Adolescents Living with HIV and the CDC/NIH/IDSA-HIVMA Opportunistic Infections Guideline Committee. For the past two years Dr. Naggie has served as the Medical Director of the Duke Department of Medicine Clinical Research Unit.

Education and Training

  • Fellow in Infectious Diseases, Medicine, Duke University, 2007 - 2009
  • Chief Medical Resident - VAMC, Medicine, Duke University, 2006 - 2007
  • Medical Resident, Medicine, Duke University, 2002 - 2005
  • M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2002

Publications

Naggie, Susanna, Becky A. Miller, Kimberly B. Zuzak, Brian W. Pence, Ashley J. Mayo, Bradly P. Nicholson, Preeta K. Kutty, L Clifford McDonald, and Christopher W. Woods. “A case-control study of community-associated Clostridium difficile infection: no role for proton pump inhibitors.” Am J Med 124, no. 3 (March 2011): 276.e1-276.e7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2010.10.013.

PMID
21396512
Full Text

Thompson, Alexander J., Rosanna Santoro, Valeria Piazzolla, Paul J. Clark, Susanna Naggie, Hans L. Tillmann, Keyur Patel, et al. “Inosine triphosphatase genetic variants are protective against anemia during antiviral therapy for HCV2/3 but do not decrease dose reductions of RBV or increase SVR.” Hepatology 53, no. 2 (February 2011): 389–95. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.24068.

PMID
21274861
Full Text

Rallon, Norma I., Clara Restrepo, Susanna Naggie, Mariola Lopez, Jorge Del Romero, David Goldstein, John McHutchison, Vincent Soriano, and Jose M. Benito. “Interleukin-28B gene polymorphisms do not influence the susceptibility to HIV-infection or CD4 cell decline.” Aids 25, no. 2 (January 14, 2011): 269–71. https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0b013e328341b84e.

PMID
21099665
Full Text

Rallon, N. I., S. Naggie, C. Restrepo, J. McHutchison, V. Soriano, and J. M. Benito. “IL28B genotypes strongly influence early viral kinetics in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with peginterferon-alpha/ribavirin - implications using directly acting antivirals.” In Antiviral Therapy, 16:A91–A91. INT MEDICAL PRESS LTD, 2011.

Scholars@Duke

Rallon, N. I., S. Naggie, C. Restrepo, J. McHutchison, V. Soriano, and J. M. Benito. “IL28B genotypes strongly influence early viral kinetics in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with peginterferon-alpha/ribavirin - implications using directly acting antivirals.” In Antiviral Therapy, 16:A91–A91, 2011.

Scholars@Duke

Thompson, Alexander J., Andrew J. Muir, Mark S. Sulkowski, Keyur Patel, Hans L. Tillmann, Paul J. Clark, Susanna Naggie, et al. “Hepatitis C trials that combine investigational agents with pegylated interferon should be stratified by interleukin-28B genotype.” Hepatology 52, no. 6 (December 2010): 2243–44. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.23826.

PMID
20890887
Full Text

Medrano, Jose, Karin Neukam, Norma Rallón, Antonio Rivero, Salvador Resino, Susanna Naggie, Antonio Caruz, et al. “Modeling the probability of sustained virological response to therapy with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in patients coinfected with hepatitis C virus and HIV.” Clin Infect Dis 51, no. 10 (November 15, 2010): 1209–16. https://doi.org/10.1086/656811.

PMID
20964522
Full Text

Thompson, Alexander J., Paul J. Clark, Mingfu Zhu, Qianqian Zhu, Dongliang Ge, Mark S. Sulkowski, Andrew J. Muir, et al. “GENOME WIDE-ASSOCIATION STUDY IDENTIFIES IL28B POLYMORPHISM TO BE ASSOCIATED WITH BASELINE ALT AND HEPATIC NECRO-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY IN CHRONIC HEPATITIS C PATIENTS ENROLLED IN THE IDEAL STUDY.” In Hepatology, 52:1220A-1221A. WILEY, 2010.

Scholars@Duke

Thompson, Alexander J., Jacques Fellay, Keyur Patel, Hans L. Tillmann, Susanna Naggie, Dongliang Ge, Thomas J. Urban, et al. “Variants in the ITPA gene protect against ribavirin-induced hemolytic anemia and decrease the need for ribavirin dose reduction.” Gastroenterology 139, no. 4 (October 2010): 1181–89. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2010.06.016.

PMID
20547162
Full Text

Naggie, Susanna, Keyur Patel, and John McHutchison. “Hepatitis C virus directly acting antivirals: current developments with NS3/4A HCV serine protease inhibitors.” J Antimicrob Chemother 65, no. 10 (October 2010): 2063–69. https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkq284.

PMID
20688770
Full Text

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