KarraRavi

For most people, heart failure is a terminal condition but not for everyone. With a grant from Translating Duke Health, Ravi Karra, MD, is bringing together Duke researchers from basic scientists to clinical researchers to try to find biomarkers that can identify these patients and improve patient outcomes.

As a cardiologist, Ravi Karra, MD, sees firsthand the suffering heart failure causes. Many of his patients eventually need heart transplants, which save lives but bring a new set of problems, including fistfuls of daily pills to prevent rejection. “Wouldn’t it be great if instead of needing a new heart, you could repair the one you already have?” asks Karra.

Four Medicine faculty are among the first round of recipients of the Duke Strong Start New Physician-Scientist Award.

8 faculty from the Department of Medicine will participate in the School of Medicine's LEADER program.

Four faculty in the Division of Cardiology have received awards from the Mandel Center for Hypertension and Atherosclerosis at Duke. The faculty are members of the Duke Cardiovascular Research Center, which has a mission of scholarship, training, and mentoring that includes developing the next leaders in cardiovascular discovery research.

Ravi Karra, MD, medical instructor in the Division of Cardiology, is a co-author of a recent article about heart regeneration in zebrafish. He also leads a clinical trial studying neuregulin in heart failure patients.

This video about tissue regeneration research in the Duke Department of Cell Biology features Cardiology fellow Ravi Karra and pulmonologist

Mary Klotman, MD, chair of the department, and Monica Kraft, MD, vice chair for research, announced the recipients of the

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