Amy Lynn Corneli, PhD

Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Associate Professor in Medicine
Associate of the Duke Initiative for Science & Society
Affiliate, Duke Global Health Institute
member of the Duke Clinical Research Institute
Campus mail 215 Morris Street, Durham, NC 27701
Phone (919) 668-9238
Email address amy.corneli@duke.edu

A social scientist by training, Dr. Corneli has conducted qualitative and mixed-method research primarily in biomedical HIV prevention and bioethics in multiple countries in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, and in the U.S.  A significant portion of her research portfolio has focused on engaging patients/participants and other key stakeholders in qualitative research to inform clinical research, socio-behavioral interventions, and material and scale/questionnaire development as well as to assess participant perceptions of intervention/clinical trial implementation. Her HIV-related research focuses on identifying evidence-based strategies for linking populations at HIV risk to PrEP care, support PrEP adherence to achieve protective levels, and keep clients engaged in PrEP care for as long as their HIV risk persists. Her research in bioethics has explored innovative methods for improving informed consent comprehension and shortening consent forms, the acceptability of informed assent, and the functioning of research ethics committees.

Areas of expertise: HIV, qualitative research methods, bioethics, health behavior

Education and Training

  • Fellow, Center for Disease Control, 1997 - 2000
  • Ph.D., University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, 2004
  • M.P.H., Emory University, 1995

Publications

Corneli, Amy, Christine Pierre, Terri Hinkley, Li Lin, Christopher B. Fordyce, Gerrit Hamre, and Matthew T. Roe. “One and done: Reasons principal investigators conduct only one FDA-regulated drug trial.” Contemp Clin Trials Commun 6 (June 2017): 31–38. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conctc.2017.02.009.

PMID
29740635
Full Text

Corneli, Amy, and Jeremy Sugarman. “Reducing Consent Form Length: Stakeholder Support, Evidence-Based Strategies, and Regulatory Requirements.” Irb 39, no. 2 (March 2017): 18–20.

PMID
30148334
Scholars@Duke

Corneli, Amy, Emily Namey, Monique P. Mueller, Jenae Tharaldson, Steve Sortijas, Thomas Grey, and Jeremy Sugarman. “Evidence-Based Strategies for Shortening Informed Consent Forms in Clinical Research.” Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics : Jerhre 12, no. 1 (February 2017): 14–25. https://doi.org/10.1177/1556264616682550.

PMID
28078953
Full Text

Namey, Emily, Kawango Agot, Khatija Ahmed, Jacob Odhiambo, Joseph Skhosana, Greg Guest, and Amy Corneli. “When and why women might suspend PrEP use according to perceived seasons of risk: implications for PrEP-specific risk-reduction counselling.” Cult Health Sex 18, no. 9 (September 2016): 1081–91. https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2016.1164899.

PMID
27093238
Full Text

Corneli, Amy, Ansley Lemons, Rose Otieno-Masaba, John Ndiritu, Catherine Packer, Jesse Lamarre-Vincent, and Lisa Dulli. “Contraceptive service delivery in Kenya: A qualitative study to identify barriers and preferences among female sex workers and health care providers.” Contraception 94, no. 1 (July 2016): 34–39. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2016.03.004.

PMID
26976072
Full Text

Corneli, Amy, Brian Perry, Kevin McKenna, Kawango Agot, Khatija Ahmed, Jamilah Taylor, Fulufhelo Malamatsho, Jacob Odhiambo, Joseph Skhosana, and Lut Van Damme. “Participants' Explanations for Nonadherence in the FEM-PrEP Clinical Trial.” J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 71, no. 4 (April 1, 2016): 452–61. https://doi.org/10.1097/QAI.0000000000000880.

PMID
26536315
Full Text

Corneli, Amy, Irina Yacobson, Kawango Agot, and Khatija Ahmed. “Guidance for Providing Informed-Choice Counseling on Sexual Health for Women Interested in Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis in Kenya and South Africa.” Aids Patient Care Stds 30, no. 3 (March 2016): 106–9. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2015.0244.

PMID
26895239
Full Text

Corneli, Amy, Emily Namey, Khatija Ahmed, Kawango Agot, Joseph Skhosana, Jacob Odhiambo, and Greg Guest. “Motivations for Reducing Other HIV Risk-Reduction Practices if Taking Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis: Findings from a Qualitative Study Among Women in Kenya and South Africa.” Aids Patient Care Stds 29, no. 9 (September 2015): 503–9. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2015.0038.

PMID
26196411
Full Text

Agot, Kawango, Douglas Taylor, Amy L. Corneli, Meng Wang, Julie Ambia, Angela D. M. Kashuba, Caleb Parker, et al. “Accuracy of Self-Report and Pill-Count Measures of Adherence in the FEM-PrEP Clinical Trial: Implications for Future HIV-Prevention Trials.” Aids Behav 19, no. 5 (May 2015): 743–51. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-014-0859-z.

PMID
25100053
Full Text

Rennie, Stuart, Brian Perry, Amy Corneli, Abdullah Chilungo, and Eric Umar. “Perceptions of voluntary medical male circumcision among circumcising and non-circumcising communities in Malawi.” Global Public Health 10, no. 5–6 (May 2015): 679–91. https://doi.org/10.1080/17441692.2015.1004737.

PMID
25630610
Full Text

Pages