Blood Pressure Homeostasis

Overview

The Coffman Laboratory is interested in mechanisms of kidney injury in disease states and the role of the kidney in regulation of blood pressure. Our research addresses issues that are relevant to disorders such as:

  • Hypertension
  • Diabetic nephropathy
  • Transplant rejection
  • Autoimmune diseases 

A major objective of our work is to identify new approaches to treatment and disease prevention. To this end, we are using molecular genetic technology to develop and refine mouse models of human diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, kidney transplant rejection, and hypertension.

We have been particularly interested in two hormone systems that impact these processes:

  • The renin-angiotensin system
  • Lipid mediators derived from cyco-oxygenase metabolism of arachidonic acid

Based on their key roles in a range of human diseases, both of these systems are important therapeutic targets in the clinic. Our studies have taken advantage of available technologies for producing genetic alterations in mice to study the physiology of these systems. As one example, we generated and characterized lines of mice lacking the major physiological receptors for angiotensin II in the mouse. These studies have provided novel information regarding the role of these receptors in blood pressure homeostasis, in promoting kidney injury in disease states, and in the regulation of inflammation.

Faculty

Thomas M. Coffman, MD
Chief, Division of Nephrology

Contact Information

Office: Room 2018 MSBR2, 106 Research Drive, Durham, NC, 27710 
Campus mail: DUMC Box 103015, Durham, NC, 27710 
Phone: 919-684-9788 
Fax: 919-684-3011