Richard Frothingham, MD

Associate Professor of Medicine
Assistant Professor in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
Member of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute
Campus mail 2424 Erwin Rd, Hock Plaza Room 9089, Durham, NC 27710
Phone (919) 684-5455
Email address richard.frothingham@duke.edu

Dr. Frothingham is the principal investigator of a research laboratory which studies Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of tuberculosis, and Mycobacterium avium, a closely related bacterium causing serious infections in AIDS patients. We are pursuing two current projects.

The first project aims to develop vaccines against M. avium and M. tuberculosis. We inject mice with candidate plasmid DNA vaccines which produce bacterial proteins in mouse muscle. We use a variety of DNA adjuvants to modify the immune response. We hope to use DNA vaccination to protect against new infections and to modify the course of existing infections. We also hope to identify correlates of vaccine-induced protective immunity.

The second project uses variations in bacterial DNA sequences to identify species and strains. Dr. Frothingham was part of a team of four Duke scientists who used DNA sequence analysis to identify the cause of Whipple's disease. He also identified used DNA sequence to identify a particular group of M. avium strains which cause disseminated infections in AIDS patients. We recently developed a new tuberculosis typing method using variable numbers of tandem DNA repeats. We are applying this new typing method in national and international collaborations.

Dr. Frothingham does not currently conduct clinical trials.

Special areas of expertise include tuberculosis, mycobacteria, strain differentiation, DNA vaccination, and pyrazinamide.

Key words: tuberculosis, mycobacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, DNA vaccines, tandem repeat DNA, pyrazinamide, mouse

Education and Training

  • Medicine and Pediatrics Resident, Medicine, University of Rochester, 1982 - 1986
  • M.D., Duke University, 1981

Publications

Barrigan, Lydia M., Shraddha Tuladhar, Jason C. Brunton, Matthew D. Woolard, Ching-ju Chen, Divey Saini, Richard Frothingham, Gregory D. Sempowski, Thomas H. Kawula, and Jeffrey A. Frelinger. “Infection with Francisella tularensis LVS clpB leads to an altered yet protective immune response..” Infect Immun 81, no. 6 (June 2013): 2028–42. https://doi.org/10.1128/IAI.00207-13.

PMID
23529616
Full Text

Barrigan, Lydia, Shraddha Tuladhar, Jason Brunton, Matthew Woolard, Ching-ju Chen, Divey Saini, Richard Frothingham, Gregory Sempowski, Thomas Kawula, and Jeffrey Frelinger. “Altered host immune responses, not lowered growth, are the mechanism of attenuation of Francisella tularensis clpB.” In Journal of Immunology, Vol. 190. AMER ASSOC IMMUNOLOGISTS, 2013.

Scholars@Duke

Springer, Deborah J., Divey Saini, Edmond J. Byrnes, Joseph Heitman, and Richard Frothingham. “Development of an aerosol model of Cryptococcus reveals humidity as an important factor affecting the viability of Cryptococcus during aerosolization..” Plos One 8, no. 7 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0069804.

PMID
23894542
Full Text

Gonzalez, Rodrigo J., Eric H. Weening, Richard Frothingham, Gregory D. Sempowski, and Virginia L. Miller. “Bioluminescence imaging to track bacterial dissemination of Yersinia pestis using different routes of infection in mice..” Bmc Microbiol 12 (July 24, 2012). https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2180-12-147.

PMID
22827851
Full Text

Saini, Divey, Gregory W. Hopkins, Sarah A. Seay, Ching-Ju Chen, Casey C. Perley, Eva M. Click, and Richard Frothingham. “Ultra-low dose of Mycobacterium tuberculosis aerosol creates partial infection in mice..” Tuberculosis (Edinb) 92, no. 2 (March 2012): 160–65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tube.2011.11.007.

PMID
22197183
Full Text

Saini, Divey, Gregory W. Hopkins, Ching-Ju Chen, Sarah A. Seay, Eva M. Click, Sunhee Lee, Justin M. Hartings, and Richard Frothingham. “Sampling port for real-time analysis of bioaerosol in whole body exposure system for animal aerosol model development..” J Pharmacol Toxicol Methods 63, no. 2 (March 2011): 143–49. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vascn.2010.09.002.

PMID
20849964
Full Text

Alderman, T Scott, Richard Frothingham, and Gregory D. Sempowski. “Validation of an Animal Isolation Imaging Chamber for Use in Animal Biosafety Level-3 Containment..” Appl Biosaf 15, no. 2 (2010): 62–66. https://doi.org/10.1177/153567601001500203.

PMID
23226978
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Larsen, Michelle H., Karolin Biermann, Bing Chen, Tsungda Hsu, Vasan K. Sambandamurthy, Andrew A. Lackner, Pyone Pyone Aye, et al. “Efficacy and safety of live attenuated persistent and rapidly cleared Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine candidates in non-human primates..” Vaccine 27, no. 34 (July 23, 2009): 4709–17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2009.05.050.

PMID
19500524
Full Text

Stout, Jason E., Gregory W. Hopkins, Jay R. McDonald, Anita Quinn, Carol D. Hamilton, L Barth Reller, and Richard Frothingham. “Association between 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer sequence groups of Mycobacterium avium complex and pulmonary disease..” J Clin Microbiol 46, no. 8 (August 2008): 2790–93. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00719-08.

PMID
18550734
Full Text

Bifani, Pablo, Barun Mathema, Natalia Kurepina, Elena Shashkina, Julie Bertout, Anne Sophie Blanchis, Soraya Moghazeh, et al. “The evolution of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from a mono-rifampin-resistant cluster into increasingly multidrug-resistant variants in an HIV-seropositive population..” J Infect Dis 198, no. 1 (July 1, 2008): 90–94. https://doi.org/10.1086/588822.

PMID
18498237
Full Text

Pages