Thomas Myron Coffman, MD

Professor of Medicine
James R. Clapp Professor of Medicine, in the School of Medicine
Professor in Cell Biology
Professor in Immunology
Campus mail Duke Box 103015, Durham, NC 27710
Phone (919) 684-9788
Email address coffm002@duke.edu

My laboratory is interested mechanisms of kidney injury in disease states and the role of the kidney in regulation of blood pressure. Our research addresses issues that are relevant to disorders such as hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, transplant rejection, and autoimmune diseases. We have been particularly interested in two hormone systems that impact these processes: (1) the renin-angiotensin system and (2) lipid mediators derived from cyco-oxygenase metabolism of arachidonic acid. Our studies have taken advantage of available technologies for producing genetic alterations in mice to study the physiology of these systems. As one example, we generated and characterized lines of mice lacking the major physiological receptors for angiotensin II in the mouse. These studies have provided novel information regarding the role of these receptors in blood pressure homeostasis, in promoting kidney injury in disease states, and in the regulation of inflammation. A major objective of our work is to identify new approaches to treatment and disease prevention. To this end, we are using molecular genetic technology to develop and refine mouse models of human diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, kidney transplant rejection, and hypertension.

Education and Training

  • Fellowship in Nephrology, Duke University School of Medicine, 1983 - 1985
  • M.D., Ohio State University, 1980

Publications

Gurley, SB, Ghosh, S, Johnson, SA, Azushima, K, Sakban, RB, George, SE, Maeda, M, Meyer, TW, and Coffman, TM. "Inflammation and Immunity Pathways Regulate Genetic Susceptibility to Diabetic Nephropathy." Diabetes 67, no. 10 (October 2018): 2096-2106.

PMID
30065034
Full Text

Azushima, K, Gurley, SB, and Coffman, TM. "Modelling diabetic nephropathy in mice." Nature Reviews. Nephrology 14, no. 1 (January 2018): 48-56. (Review)

PMID
29062142
Full Text

Coffman, TM. "Oliver Smithies: A Remembrance." Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979) 70, no. 1 (July 2017): 3-4.

PMID
28559396
Full Text

Stegbauer, J, Chen, D, Herrera, M, Sparks, MA, Yang, T, Königshausen, E, Gurley, SB, and Coffman, TM. "Resistance to hypertension mediated by intercalated cells of the collecting duct." JCI insight 2, no. 7 (April 6, 2017): e92720-.

PMID
28405625
Full Text

Tyson, CC, and Coffman, TM. "In the Wake of Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial: New Targets for Improving Hypertension Management in Chronic Kidney Disease?." Nephron 135, no. 4 (January 2017): 287-290.

PMID
28161697
Full Text

Tinning, AR, Jensen, BL, Johnsen, I, Chen, D, Coffman, TM, and Madsen, K. "Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling is necessary for expansion of medullary microvessels during postnatal kidney development." American Journal of Physiology Renal Physiology 311, no. 3 (September 2016): F586-F599.

PMID
27413199
Full Text

Paradis, P, Briet, M, Barhoumi, T, Mian, MOR, Coelho, SC, Rautureau, Y, Coffman, TM, and Schiffrin, EL. "PS 07-16 CROSSTALK BETWEEN ALDOSTERONE-STIMULATED MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR AND ANGIOTENSIN RECEPTOR PATHWAYS PLAYS A ROLE IN ALDOSTERONE-INDUCED VASCULAR INJURY." September 2016.

Full Text

Chen, D, Stegbauer, J, Sparks, MA, Kohan, D, Griffiths, R, Herrera, M, Gurley, SB, and Coffman, TM. "Impact of Angiotensin Type 1A Receptors in Principal Cells of the Collecting Duct on Blood Pressure and Hypertension." Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979) 67, no. 6 (June 2016): 1291-1297.

PMID
27141055
Full Text

Briet, M, Barhoumi, T, Mian, MOR, Coelho, SC, Ouerd, S, Rautureau, Y, Coffman, TM, Paradis, P, and Schiffrin, EL. "Aldosterone-Induced Vascular Remodeling and Endothelial Dysfunction Require Functional Angiotensin Type 1a Receptors." May 2016.

PMID
27045029
Full Text

Briet, M, Barhoumi, T, Mian, MOR, Coelho, SC, Ouerd, S, Rautureau, Y, Coffman, TM, Paradis, P, and Schiffrin, EL. "Aldosterone-Induced Vascular Remodeling and Endothelial Dysfunction Require Functional Angiotensin Type 1a Receptors." Hypertension 67, no. 5 (May 2016): 897-905.

Full Text

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