Support Services

Many patients and their families become emotionally worn out from the problems associated with sickle cell disease.  Occasionally, patients or family members become stressed and even depressed.  These feelings are completely normal and common.  We are fortunate to have a team to help you and your family cope with these feelings. 

Many families benefit from group and/or private counseling sessions.  If you are experiencing difficulties with school, employment, or the demands of daily living, our staff is readily available to help you address these issues and/or refer you to the appropriate health care professional. 

Please ask to speak with our social worker or one of our staff by phone or during a clinic visit.  You may also schedule an appointment in clinic with TBA, clinical psychologist.  She is in the sickle cell clinic on Mondays and Wednesdays. You can also see her at her alternate location located at the Duke Pain Clinic near Duke Regional. 

Support Group

The Center has an active patient/family support group located in Durham. The support group meets on the third Saturday of every month from 11 a. m. to 12:30 p.m. at Lincoln Community Health Center, First Floor (lower level) Conference Room A, 1301 Fayetteville Street, Durham, NC 27707. Contact DASC@duke.edu for more information.

It is a voluntary organization run by adult patients with sickle cell disease, parents and families of children with sickle cell disease and interested others. At scheduled meetings, issues relevant to patients and families are discussed and guest speakers are often invited to address specific topics. Patient advocacy for your health care needs is often a topic of discussion. If you or your family members are interested in attending these meetings, please call the office for more specific information. We also have listings of other support groups available around the state which can be made available upon request.

Genetic Counseling

Sickle cell disease is a hereditary illness which is passed on from parents to children.  Many patients and their families do not completely understand how sickle cell disease is passed through genes. If you would like to ask any questions about the genetics of the disease or receive more information of a specific nature, please ask for an appointment with a member of our staff or a referral to the state genetic education counselor that serves your area. You can also pick up free literature provided in the Sickle Cell Office or contact Tiffany Bell, tiffany.bell@duke.edu or 919-684-8381.